Another Apollo Co-Founder Steps Back

Vegan milk is now a multibillion-dollar business on Wall Street. Oatly, the oat milk maker, priced its I.P.O. at $17 a share, the top end of its range, valuing it at about $10 billion. Part of the reason it appeared to avoid broader market declines is that it courted investors focused on so-called E.S.G. principles.

Even by Bitcoin’s standards, it’s been a wild week. A particularly steep drop in the cryptocurrency yesterday seemed to drag the entire market down with it, and the frenzy led to outages at big exchanges like Binance and Coinbase. Then, it came roaring back in late trading (Elon Musk tweeted about it) and has held the gains so far today. Still, Bitcoin is down by about a third from the all-time high it set just over a week ago.

The episode proves the point of skeptics that digital assets are too volatile to be taken seriously, and of die-hard supporters who say that the ups and downs come with the territory. DealBook spoke with Changpeng “C.Z.” Zhao, the C.E.O. of Binance, the world’s largest crypto exchange, about what it all means.

“It was a busy day but it happens,” C.Z. said. “I think it’s pretty typical.” It’s a commonly held belief among the crypto crowd that big corrections are part of the journey to new heights. “If you look at 2017, where there was a bull market, there were at least two instances of 40 percent drawdowns,” he said. New investors rushing in “may or may not be fully committed” but he believes it’s good for the markets to “shake out” the jittery types.

Lawmakers aren’t so sure. Yesterday, the Senate Banking Committee chair, Sherrod Brown — a crypto skeptic — wrote to the acting Comptroller of the Currency, Michael Hsu, with concerns about crypto companies getting approved for national trust charters. In particular, Brown mentioned that the approvals came under the former acting comptroller, Brian Brooks, who once worked for Coinbase and recently became the C.E.O. of Binance’s U.S. division.

  • “Given the many uncertainties present in the digital asset landscape as identified by other regulators, the volatility of digital asset valuations, and the disproportionate influence individuals can have on entire cryptocurrency markets, the O.C.C. is not in a position to regulate these entities comparably to traditional banks,” Brown wrote.

All eyes are on the regulators. One factor in yesterday’s crash appeared to be a warning from China’s central bank that reiterated the ban on financial institutions in the country dealing in cryptocurrencies. Many of the crypto market’s ups and downs come amid questions about regulation driving mainstream acceptance (or not), as when the launch of a Bitcoin futures exchange in 2017 accompanied the last big run-up in crypto prices.

  • The next milestone, perhaps, is whether the S.E.C. will approve proposals for a Bitcoin E.T.F., which it will likely decide by the end of the year. Crypto’s champion at the S.E.C., commissioner Hester Peirce, last week responded to her colleagues’ qualms about Bitcoin by saying she hopes American investors will “finally” have access to crypto-based securities, so it’s clear where she stands.


— Joseph Blount, the C.E.O. of Colonial Pipeline, in his first public interview about paying a ransom to hackers after a cyberattack crippled its systems. Colonial paid in Bitcoin worth $4.4 million, but the decryption tool it received in return didn’t immediately work, and the pipeline was shut for six days.

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